Nepal Now

Nepal Now is a podcast series where Marty Logan speaks to Nepalis about building a better country.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this podcast series do not necessarily represent the views of The Record.

On the rights path: Mohna Ansari

NEPAL NOW - January 08, 2021

I’ve followed human rights issues for much of my career. I even worked for the UN human rights office in Nepal soon after the civil war ended in the mid-2000s. Back then, Nepal’s own human rights commission was quite insular, focused on overcoming the huge challenges around the conflict using the few resources it had available in a sometimes hostile environment.

Young activists will endure rape culture no longer

NEPAL NOW - December 30, 2020

‘The rapist is you’. On October 10th a group of about 20 young women dressed in black took over a street in Kathmandu pointed straight ahead accusingly, and performed the anti-rape song ‘A rapist in your path’. The ‘flash mob’ was protesting what feels like an epidemic of rape in the country. In recent months it seems that every week the media is reporting another violent incident, often against adolescent girls, too often ending in murder. ‘Ajhai kati sahane?’

The labour migration trap

NEPAL NOW - December 04, 2020

According to one of today’s guests, 1 in 5 working age Nepalis is overseas for employment at any one time. In 2019, the earnings sent home by these workers, known as remittances, totalled about $US8 billion, or 25% of Nepal’s gross domestic product, the economic value of its output.
COVID-19 hammered labour migration, and the lives of many Nepalis. Some remain stuck in countries far from home, jobless after being cast aside when local economies tanked and the Nepal government refused to let them fly home. Others walked or hitched rides, and were stuck in crude quarantine camps on Nepal’s border with India after the country locked down on March 24th.

Climate action — an Indigenous view

NEPAL NOW - November 29, 2020

As a developing country Nepal has few resources to devote to climate change. But as of late last year it has started to receive money from something called the Green Climate Fund to both reduce its own emissions and adapt to climate change. So far $73 million has been earmarked from the Fund for two projects. But who decides how that money is spent?

As strong as Everest’: Engaging the private sector to fight malnutrition

NEPAL NOW - November 20, 2020

In 2019, 19-year-old girls in Nepal were the third shortest in the world, found a recent study by the journal The Lancet that ranked 200 countries.
That’s not simply a genetic thing: ‘Nepalis are short’. A third of adolescent boys and girls in Nepal — 1.8 million — are stunted, or too short for their age. Others are too thin for their age, or wasted. These various forms of undernutrition contribute to 25,000 child deaths in Nepal each year, or 52 per cent of child deaths, more than any other cause, says UNICEF.

Leading the fight for transgender rights

NEPAL NOW - November 17, 2020

Rukshana Kapali is a firebrand. At 21 she is leading efforts to change Nepal’s laws so they include transgender men and women, and spearheading work to develop terminology in Nepali, and Nepal bhasa (or Newa language), that is inclusive of people who identify anywhere along the gender spectrum. She has led campaigns to protect lands of Kathmandu Valley’s Indigenous Newa people and has joined heritage activists to ensure that an ancient, sacred pond in the centre of Nepal’s capital Kathmandu was rebuilt following traditional designs.

Women in the age of COVID-19

NEPAL NOW - November 06, 2020

I obviously don’t know if it’s harder to be a woman in Nepal than in other places, but often it seems like it must be.
Around 1,200 women here die each year giving birth, many from a simple post-delivery haemorrhage. (The fact that no one seems to know the exact number speaks volumes about the importance officialdom places on the issue). Tens of thousands of other women endure the condition known as uterine prolapse.

Dalit lives matter — but to who?

NEPAL NOW - October 12, 2020

Anyone who lives in Nepal knows about caste and untouchability — the social rules that slot people into rigid groups from which they can rarely escape. At the bottom of the caste hierarchy are the Dalits, previously known as untouchables. Anyone living in Nepal would be aware of the deadly, violent crimes committed against Dalits, almost always with no legal consequences.

Nepal Now

Nepal Now is a podcast series where Marty Logan speaks to Nepalis about building a better country.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this podcast series do not necessarily represent the views of The Record.

On the rights path: Mohna Ansari

NEPAL NOW - January 08, 2021

I’ve followed human rights issues for much of my career. I even worked for the UN human rights office in Nepal soon after the civil war ended in the mid-2000s. Back then, Nepal’s own human rights commission was quite insular, focused on overcoming the huge challenges around the conflict using the few resources it had available in a sometimes hostile environment.

Young activists will endure rape culture no longer

NEPAL NOW - December 30, 2020

‘The rapist is you’. On October 10th a group of about 20 young women dressed in black took over a street in Kathmandu pointed straight ahead accusingly, and performed the anti-rape song ‘A rapist in your path’. The ‘flash mob’ was protesting what feels like an epidemic of rape in the country. In recent months it seems that every week the media is reporting another violent incident, often against adolescent girls, too often ending in murder. ‘Ajhai kati sahane?’

The labour migration trap

NEPAL NOW - December 04, 2020

According to one of today’s guests, 1 in 5 working age Nepalis is overseas for employment at any one time. In 2019, the earnings sent home by these workers, known as remittances, totalled about $US8 billion, or 25% of Nepal’s gross domestic product, the economic value of its output.
COVID-19 hammered labour migration, and the lives of many Nepalis. Some remain stuck in countries far from home, jobless after being cast aside when local economies tanked and the Nepal government refused to let them fly home. Others walked or hitched rides, and were stuck in crude quarantine camps on Nepal’s border with India after the country locked down on March 24th.

Climate action — an Indigenous view

NEPAL NOW - November 29, 2020

As a developing country Nepal has few resources to devote to climate change. But as of late last year it has started to receive money from something called the Green Climate Fund to both reduce its own emissions and adapt to climate change. So far $73 million has been earmarked from the Fund for two projects. But who decides how that money is spent?

As strong as Everest’: Engaging the private sector to fight malnutrition

NEPAL NOW - November 20, 2020

In 2019, 19-year-old girls in Nepal were the third shortest in the world, found a recent study by the journal The Lancet that ranked 200 countries.
That’s not simply a genetic thing: ‘Nepalis are short’. A third of adolescent boys and girls in Nepal — 1.8 million — are stunted, or too short for their age. Others are too thin for their age, or wasted. These various forms of undernutrition contribute to 25,000 child deaths in Nepal each year, or 52 per cent of child deaths, more than any other cause, says UNICEF.

Leading the fight for transgender rights

NEPAL NOW - November 17, 2020

Rukshana Kapali is a firebrand. At 21 she is leading efforts to change Nepal’s laws so they include transgender men and women, and spearheading work to develop terminology in Nepali, and Nepal bhasa (or Newa language), that is inclusive of people who identify anywhere along the gender spectrum. She has led campaigns to protect lands of Kathmandu Valley’s Indigenous Newa people and has joined heritage activists to ensure that an ancient, sacred pond in the centre of Nepal’s capital Kathmandu was rebuilt following traditional designs.

Women in the age of COVID-19

NEPAL NOW - November 06, 2020

I obviously don’t know if it’s harder to be a woman in Nepal than in other places, but often it seems like it must be.
Around 1,200 women here die each year giving birth, many from a simple post-delivery haemorrhage. (The fact that no one seems to know the exact number speaks volumes about the importance officialdom places on the issue). Tens of thousands of other women endure the condition known as uterine prolapse.

Dalit lives matter — but to who?

NEPAL NOW - October 12, 2020

Anyone who lives in Nepal knows about caste and untouchability — the social rules that slot people into rigid groups from which they can rarely escape. At the bottom of the caste hierarchy are the Dalits, previously known as untouchables. Anyone living in Nepal would be aware of the deadly, violent crimes committed against Dalits, almost always with no legal consequences.

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